All posts by NickMiller

California Love – New Remix by Nick Miller

Download It Now!

I’m very happy to announce my latest album that I’m putting out. This album is called “California Love” and it’s a remix of 2PAC’s California Love.

Track List:
1) California Love (Remix)
2) California Love (Instrumental)

Programs Used:

- FL Studio 9
- Virtual DJ
- Audacity
- Photoshop (For Album Cover)

Review: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200rpm HDD

Intro:

I will state from the beginning that I am a Seagate fanboy, but I will try to give a fair review on this product. What I mean by that is I won’t glorify it anymore then I would another drive.

Price:

I got this drive on sale at BestBuy for $79.99, but the retail price is $99.99 so I guess it’s a good deal! (If you think $0.10 per gigabyte is a good price)

Packaging:

Seagate did a really good job when it came to packaging this product! There was no bubble rap, but they did put the drive in foam end caps so at no time did the drive ever touch the box. The drive came in an anti-static bag which was good for placing the drive on while I routed the SATA cable for the new drive.

Contents of Box:

The box came with a few things in it…

-          Seagate Barracuda 3.5in internal drive (of course :/)

-          SATA interface cable

-          SATA power cable

-          CD with DiskWizard software and manual

-          Quick start guide

-          Mounting screws

-          5 year limited warranty

Performance:

Well, for a storage drive this is amazingly fast. I have the 250GB version of this drive for my boot drive. It was a big difference from the old IDE hdd I had. I boot a lot of Virtual Machines from this drive and it is amazingly fast (besides Windows Vista), For the average user I say that a 5400rpm hard drve (for storage) will do the job, but if you need speed, just go for the faster drive.

Overview:

This drive is amazing! It is very sturdy and quiet. My case fans (on low) are louder than the drive at full speed! I give this hard drive a 5 out of 5! I definitely recommend it to anyone.

Original Post: http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/2010/review-seagate-barracuda-1tb-7200rpm-hdd/

Apple announces new iMacs, Mac Pro, 27″ Cinema Display, Magic Trackpad

As has been rumoured for some time, Apple has today announced a slew of product updates and entirely new products. I am so excited because I have been waiting for a Mac Pro refresh for a while (along with the iMac).

imacsUpdated iMacs featuring new Intel Core i3, i5 & i7 processors

The iMacs received an update, with overall cosmetics remaining unchanged, but under the hood are a new range of Intel processors from the entry-level Core i3 right up to a newer Core i7 with Hyper Threading. New graphics processors are also present in the form of the ATI Radeon HD 4670 (21.5″ only) and 5670 (21.5″ & 27″) with 256MB GDDR3 and 512MB GDDR5 memory respectively. The top-end quad-core specification 27″ iMac is configured with an ATI Radeon HD 5750 with 1GB GDDR5. Like the Mac Pro, SSD drives are now also available as a CTO option.

12-core Mac Pro with 2TB SSD drives CTO option

Mac ProApple’s Mac Pro powerhouse computers had been starved of an update, but finally got a healthy refresh with new processor configurations including the new “Westmere” Intel Xeon processors, running at up to 2.93GHz in a dual processor configuration with 6 cores each, deliver up to 12 cores.

Hard drive options now include, for the first in an Apple desktop, SSD drives, with configuration options allowing up to four 512GB SSD drives. Apple has posted test results showing SSD’s outperforming 7200RPM HDD’s by up to twice the speed, although it hasn’t posted any comparable results against 15,400RPM SAS HDD’s.

27″ LED-backlit Cinema Display

Cinema DisplayBased on the same IPS panel as used in the current generation iMac, a new 27″ Cinema Display has been announced for a September shipping date, and features the same style housing as the existing 24″ LED Cinema Display. With a 2560×1600 resolution which almost matches the 30″ Cinema Display, the new 27″ Cinema Display is Apple’s first standalone monitor to feature a 16:9 aspect ratio, compared to the previous 16:10 offerings.

Like the 24″ Cinema Display, the new 27″ monitor also features built-in iSight camera, microphone, speakers including subwoofer, and utilises the industry-standard Mini DisplayPort. The connections also include a MagSafe adaptor for charging Macbook models via the monitor’s power source.

Magic TrackpadMagic Trackpad

Another entirely new product, the Magic Trackpad is Apple’s offering to desktop users of a trackpad, just like the ones found on Macbook models, so that desktop warriors can take advantage of multi-touch gestures too, like their mobile-using counterparts.

The new Magic Trackpad is 80% larger than standard trackpads found on Macbooks, and the whole pad area acts as a mouse button click too. The design is based on the same structure as the Apple Bluetooth keyboard.
Combined with useful 3rd party tools such as BetterTouchTool (based on the MultiClutch project), the Magic Trackpad could add a nice new ‘touch’ to desktop Macs… pun intended. Sorry.

Written By Nick Miller of http://www.nickmiller.co.cc

EasyBCD 2.0 Makes Dual-Booting Easier, Now Supports Windows 7

EasyBCD 2.0 Makes Dual-Booting Easier, Now Supports Windows 7

Windows only: Bootloader tweaking utility EasyBCD makes dual booting between Windows, Linux, and even OS X an easy task, and the latest version updates with support for Windows 7 and newer Ubuntu versions with grub2.

Once you’ve installed the application, you can easily edit, rename, reorder, add entries, and customize just about anything in the bootloader sequence for any number of installed operating systems. You can access a set of tools that will let you backup, restore, and repair your bootloader, and even change your boot drive.

The new 2.0 release of the application comes with a slew of changes, the most notable including Windows 7 support, bootable ISO images, and adding bootable USB drives to the bootloader. It’s well worth a look if you’re setting up a dual-boot configuration.

Article Written by Nick Miller of www.nickmiller.co.cc

Google SSL Beta

Well, Google has come up with a new way to search the internet more securely. You can search Google using SSL at https://encrypted.google.com/ . I guess it is more for peace of mind, because other than the “Google SSL Beta” logo on the page, there is no real way to tell that you are secure. Well, then again, I never thought of “Google Searching” to be unsecure (unless you click on links that look shady). I guess this is the way Google is planning to go with their search engine. I guess if it actually makes a difference in our security as web surfers, then this could be awesome. I have this now set as my homepage, so I guess I will search securely from now on.

Quote From Google:

With Google search over SSL, you can have an end-to-end encrypted search solution between your computer and Google. This secured channel helps protect your search terms and your search results pages from being intercepted by a third party. This provides you with a more secure and private search experience. What is SSL?
SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a protocol that helps provide secure Internet communications for services like web browsing, e-mail, instant messaging, and other data transfers. When you search over SSL, your search queries and search traffic are encrypted so they can’t be read by any intermediary party such as employers and internet service providers (ISPs).
What can I expect from search over SSL?
Here’s how searching over SSL is different from regular Google search:

* SSL encrypts the communication channel between Google and a searcher’s computer. When search traffic is encrypted, it can’t be read by third parties trying to access the connection between a searcher’s computer and Google’s servers. Note that the SSL protocol does have some limitations — more details are below.
* As another layer of privacy, SSL search turns off a browser’s referrers New window icon. Web browsers typically turn off referrers when going from HTTPS to HTTP mode to provide extra privacy. By clicking on a search result that takes you to an HTTP site, you could disable any customizations that the website provides based on the referrer information.
* At this time, search over SSL is supported only on Google web search. We will continue to work to support other products like Images and Maps. All features that are not supported have been removed from the left panel and the row of links at the top. You’ll continue to see integrated results like images and maps, and clicking those results will take you out of encrypted search mode.
* Your Google experience using SSL search might be slightly slower than you’re used to because your computer needs to first establish a secure connection with Google.

Note that SSL search does not reduce the data that Google receives and logs when you search, or change the listing of these terms in your Web History New window icon.

Article Written By Nick Miller of http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/

Storage Homemade 16TB NAS dwarfs the competition with insane build quality (video)

From the man that brought you the OS Xbox Pro and the Cinematograph HD comes… a cockpit canopy filled with hard drives? Not quite. Meet the Black Dwarf, a custom network-attached-storage device from the mind of video editor Will Urbina, packing 16TB of RAID 5 magnetic media and a 1.66GHz Atom N270 CPU into a completely hand-built Lexan, aluminum and steel enclosure. Urbina says the Dwarf writes at 88MB per second and reads at a fantastic 266MB per second, making the shuttlecraft-shaped 12.7TB array nearly as speedy as an SSD but with massive capacity and some redundancy to boot. As usual, the DIY guru shot a professional time-lapse video of his entire build process, and this one’s not to be missed — it showcases some pretty spiffy camerawork as well as the man’s welding skills. See sparks fly after the break.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=358

Apple renaming Mac OS X?

I was on MacRumors and I stumbled upon an article saying that Apple was considering renaming the famous Mac OS X. I was like “Holy Shiz!?!? What is Apple thinking???”. The plan that I read was that they wanted it to be re-branded as “iOS”. With the launch on the new iPhone 4 and the new iOS 4.0, It seems to have sparked ideas in Apple Developer’s minds. Personally I think it is because the ran out of good sounding “cat” names for any new operating systems to come, but I don’t know the exact reason.

See the Article:

Hardmac reports that it has heard that Apple is considering rebranding Mac OS X under the new “iOS” name recently rolled out as a replacement for “iPhone OS”. The change would serve as a means for uniting Apple’s operating systems under a single naming scheme with multiple flavors.

They are currently thinking of using iOS as the default naming/branding of Apple OS. We would then have iOS desktop, iOS server and iOS mobile. The final decision is not taken yet, however, the proposal seems to be well supported by the high management, it would give a better exposure and unity to Apple OS platforms while making communication easier.
Such a change could facilitate branding and marketing if Apple were to release touchscreen-enabled Macs running an “iOS mobile” layer on top of the traditional Mac OS X.

While the “i” naming scheme has become synonymous with Apple’s mobile devices, it obviously has its origins in the iMac, introduced in 1998 and carried along through multiple iterations to today’s desktop computer still bearing the same name. A tighter marketing integration of Apple’s traditional Mac operating system and mobile operating system could help Apple position itself for a future where lines between computing environments continue to blur.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=402

Optimize How Windows 7 Runs 16-Bit and MS-DOS-Based Programs

Most existing 16-bit and MS-DOS-based programs were originally written for Windows 3.0 or Windows 3.1. Windows 7 runs these older programs using a virtual machine that mimics the 386-enhanced mode used by Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1. Unlike on other recent releases of Windows, on Windows 7 each 16-bit and MS-DOS-based application runs as a thread within a single virtual machine. This means that if you run multiple 16-bit and MS-DOS-based applications, they all share a common memory space. Unfortunately, if one of these applications hangs or crashes, it usually means the others will as well.

You can help prevent one 16-bit or MS-DOS-based application from causing others to hang or crash by running it in a separate memory space. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Right-click the program’s shortcut icon and then click Properties. (If the program doesn’t have a shortcut, create one, and then open the shortcut’s Properties dialog box.)
2. On the Shortcut tab, click the Advanced button. This displays the Advanced Properties dialog box.
3. Select the Run In Separate Memory Space check box.
4. Click OK twice to close all open dialog boxes and save the changes.

NOTE: Running a program in a separate memory space uses additional memory. However, you’ll usually find that the program is more responsive. Another added benefit is that you are able to run multiple instances of the program—as long as all the instances are running in separate memory spaces.

From the Microsoft Press book Windows 7 Administrator’s Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=391

The Google Tablet Is Coming, Courtesy of Verizon

The first serious challenge to the Apple iPad is coming from the most obvious of teams: According to Verizon Chief Exec Lowell McAdam, the carrier is working with Google on “a tablet computer.” This should be fun.

The WSJ report is about as sparse as possible, mentioning nothing beyond the fact that Verizon wants a tablet, and are now working with Google. Says McAdam:

We’re looking at all the things Google has in its archives that we could put on a tablet to make it a great experience.

I’m guessing that didn’t come out quite right, but I’ll hazard a guess that this means the the partnership is brand new, and that neither company knows exactly how they’re going to move forward. I hope for the sake of both companies, and us, that this means that Google is working with Verizon on making the ultimate Android tablet, and that Chrome OS will get brushed aside until it’s a bit, er, better.

Let’s play a little game of best case/worst case, shall we?

Best Case

Google’s ready to prove its tablet mettle, and Verizon wants an answer to AT&T’s iPad. It’s Shakespearean, almost, kind of! Within months, AT&T and Verizon will fall deeply in love, and commit suicide due to an easily avoidable misunderstanding. No, wait, wrong play. I wanted the one where EVERYONE FIGHTS EVERYONE, AND IT IS AWESOME. This could mean:

• An Android tablet launched with the backing of a major carrier, and presumably a high-profile hardware manufacturer (Motorola?)
• Hardware within six months
• An interesting data pricing strategy from Verizon, which will need to compete with AT&T novel (but flawed) a la carte system
• An early start against other tablets, specifically from the newly invigorated Palm
• WAR

Worst Case

Sometimes Google is unfocused. Sometimes Verizon is out of touch. With their powers combined, we could end up with:

• A Chrome OS tablet. Web-only tablets aren’t as cool as you’d think. Google and Verizon need to beat the iPad, not the JooJoo. Remember this concept? Eh. Eric Schmidt reportedly told people that the first Google tablet would run Android, but you never know.
• Massive lead time. Android was announced in November of 2007, which was interpreted (correctly) as Google’s move to compete with the iPhone. Problem is, the T-Mobile G1 didn’t ship until nearly a year later. This tablet needs to hit the market well before the next iteration of the iPad, and at least as quickly as whatever WebOS slate HP is working on right now.
• Stupid data pricing. Verizon took Microsoft’s promising new Kin and strangled it in the delivery room. A traditional contract, or overpriced data, could do the same to a tablet.
• A raw Android tablet. The iPad has problems, nearly all of which Android is poised to avoid—but that could befall it, if Google hasn’t been paying attention. I’m talking about better media support, open accessory compatibility, and a syncing app that exists, but isn’t necessary for the device to function.

Granted, this whole thing could be a public bargaining strategy for Verizon, a misrepresentation of the facts by an executive who doesn’t seem to have a perfectly clear view of the facts, or mere hot air. But I don’t want to believe that. I can’t. [WSJ]

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/2010/05/the-google-tablet-is-coming-courtesy-of-verizon/

http://gizmodo.com/5536535/the-google-tablet-is-coming-courtesy-of-verizon