Storage Homemade 16TB NAS dwarfs the competition with insane build quality (video)

From the man that brought you the OS Xbox Pro and the Cinematograph HD comes… a cockpit canopy filled with hard drives? Not quite. Meet the Black Dwarf, a custom network-attached-storage device from the mind of video editor Will Urbina, packing 16TB of RAID 5 magnetic media and a 1.66GHz Atom N270 CPU into a completely hand-built Lexan, aluminum and steel enclosure. Urbina says the Dwarf writes at 88MB per second and reads at a fantastic 266MB per second, making the shuttlecraft-shaped 12.7TB array nearly as speedy as an SSD but with massive capacity and some redundancy to boot. As usual, the DIY guru shot a professional time-lapse video of his entire build process, and this one’s not to be missed — it showcases some pretty spiffy camerawork as well as the man’s welding skills. See sparks fly after the break.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=358

Apple renaming Mac OS X?

I was on MacRumors and I stumbled upon an article saying that Apple was considering renaming the famous Mac OS X. I was like “Holy Shiz!?!? What is Apple thinking???”. The plan that I read was that they wanted it to be re-branded as “iOS”. With the launch on the new iPhone 4 and the new iOS 4.0, It seems to have sparked ideas in Apple Developer’s minds. Personally I think it is because the ran out of good sounding “cat” names for any new operating systems to come, but I don’t know the exact reason.

See the Article:

Hardmac reports that it has heard that Apple is considering rebranding Mac OS X under the new “iOS” name recently rolled out as a replacement for “iPhone OS”. The change would serve as a means for uniting Apple’s operating systems under a single naming scheme with multiple flavors.

They are currently thinking of using iOS as the default naming/branding of Apple OS. We would then have iOS desktop, iOS server and iOS mobile. The final decision is not taken yet, however, the proposal seems to be well supported by the high management, it would give a better exposure and unity to Apple OS platforms while making communication easier.
Such a change could facilitate branding and marketing if Apple were to release touchscreen-enabled Macs running an “iOS mobile” layer on top of the traditional Mac OS X.

While the “i” naming scheme has become synonymous with Apple’s mobile devices, it obviously has its origins in the iMac, introduced in 1998 and carried along through multiple iterations to today’s desktop computer still bearing the same name. A tighter marketing integration of Apple’s traditional Mac operating system and mobile operating system could help Apple position itself for a future where lines between computing environments continue to blur.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=402

Optimize How Windows 7 Runs 16-Bit and MS-DOS-Based Programs

Most existing 16-bit and MS-DOS-based programs were originally written for Windows 3.0 or Windows 3.1. Windows 7 runs these older programs using a virtual machine that mimics the 386-enhanced mode used by Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1. Unlike on other recent releases of Windows, on Windows 7 each 16-bit and MS-DOS-based application runs as a thread within a single virtual machine. This means that if you run multiple 16-bit and MS-DOS-based applications, they all share a common memory space. Unfortunately, if one of these applications hangs or crashes, it usually means the others will as well.

You can help prevent one 16-bit or MS-DOS-based application from causing others to hang or crash by running it in a separate memory space. To do this, follow these steps:
1. Right-click the program’s shortcut icon and then click Properties. (If the program doesn’t have a shortcut, create one, and then open the shortcut’s Properties dialog box.)
2. On the Shortcut tab, click the Advanced button. This displays the Advanced Properties dialog box.
3. Select the Run In Separate Memory Space check box.
4. Click OK twice to close all open dialog boxes and save the changes.

NOTE: Running a program in a separate memory space uses additional memory. However, you’ll usually find that the program is more responsive. Another added benefit is that you are able to run multiple instances of the program—as long as all the instances are running in separate memory spaces.

From the Microsoft Press book Windows 7 Administrator’s Pocket Consultant by William R. Stanek.

http://www.nickmiller.co.cc/?p=391

PSP go with free games

Okay, some of you may have already noticed from other sources but I think it could mean big news especially with E3 just around the corner.

If you register your PSP Go before November using the Playstation website you can get ten games at no extra cost, let me say (write?) that again… You get 10 games for free!

The games aren’t bad either quite a few of them are some of the best you can own for the PSP system, they are as follows:

  • LittleBigPlanet
  • MotorStorm Arctic Edge
  • Need for Speed Shift
  • Assassins Creed: Bloodlines
  • Grand Theft Auto: Vice City Stories
  • Gran Turismo
  • James Cameron’s Avatar: The Game
  • Pursuit Force: Extreme Justice
  • 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa
  • Wipeout Pure

Not too shabby, some great games there im sure you will agree. but why just now, why didn’t Sony do this offer earlier to shift some more PSP Go’s at launch? I have a theory and that is that I think Sony Computer Entertainment are going to announce something big at E3. Not necessarily a “PSP2″ system but I do think it will have something to do with the Playstation Portable.

my advice would be if your thinking about getting a PSP and you don’t already own one, get a PSP Go but if you have a PSP already don’t bother, you probably own half (if not more) of the games stated above. Also this offer is for the AE, AU, GB, IE, NZ only, USA on the other hand only get three games so…

[source: http://blog.eu.playstation.com/2010/06/01/buy-a-new-pspgo-and-get-10-free-games/]

what’s your thoughts? leave a comment below or post in the Forums.